Blog

June 13, 2017
Release of HLG’s “A Guidebook for Increasing Housing Affordability in the Greater Washington Region”

We are very excited to announce that the Housing Leaders Group’s Guidebook for Increasing Housing Affordability in the Greater Washington Region is now publicly available for downloading and can be accessed right here. The Guidebook focuses on local resources and strategies for housing production and preservation, and was compiled by Lisa Sturtevant, PhD.

To download the Guidebook, click here: GUIDEBOOK – Electronic – FINAL


March 31, 2017
Clear Path Forward for Regional Leaders After Thursday’s Event, “The Roadmap for Washington Region’s Economic Future: Where Are We Now?”

On Thursday, March 30, regional leaders came together to discuss the status of the Roadmap for Greater Washington.

View the presentations that were featured, as well as photos, below:

Cary Hatch on  Rebranding Greater Washington – Fundraising Video

Stephen Fuller: Roadmap Update: Comparative Performance of Regional and National Clusters: March 2014 – March 2016

Ellen Harpel and Mark White: Career pathways for middle-skill jobs in the Greater Washington region’s leading industry clusters

 

 

Bob Buchanan welcomes Senator Van Hollen (D-MD) to speak

Bob Buchanan, of The 2030 Group, welcomes Senator Van Hollen (D-MD) to speak

 

Sen. Van Hollen (D-MD) speaks on the importance of regionalism

Sen. Van Hollen (D-MD) speaks on the importance of regionalism

Cary Hatch, of MDB Communications, presents on rebranding Greater Washington

Cary Hatch, of MDB Communications, presents on rebranding Greater Washington

Don Graham, of Graham Holdings Company, Al Grasso, of MITRE, Rosie Allen-Herring, of United Way of the National Capital Area, and Maryland Secretary of Commerce, Mike Gill, discuss regionalism on a penal moderated by Bob McCartney, of the Washington Post

Don Graham, of Graham Holdings Company, Al Grasso, of MITRE, Rosie Allen-Herring, of United Way of the National Capital Area, and Maryland Secretary of Commerce, Mike Gill, discuss regionalism on a penal moderated by Bob McCartney, of the Washington Post

Dr. Stephen S. Fuller, of The Fuller Institute, presents on the Greater Washington economy

Dr. Stephen S. Fuller, of The Fuller Institute, presents on the Greater Washington economy

Ellen Harpel, of Business Development Advisors, presents on growing Greater Washington's workforce

Ellen Harpel, of Business Development Advisors, presents on growing Greater Washington’s workforce

David Bowers, of Enterprise,  Bob Sweeney, of The Global Cities Initiative,  Emeka Moneme, of the Federal City Council/Metro Reform Initiative, and  Jonathan Aberman, of Amplifier Ventures and Tandem NSI, discuss the 2030 Roadmap for Greater Washington on a panel moderated by Bob Buchanan, of The 2030 Group

David Bowers, of Enterprise,  Bob Sweeney, of The Global Cities Initiative, Emeka Moneme, of the Federal City Council/Metro Reform Initiative, and  Jonathan Aberman, of Amplifier Ventures and Tandem NSI, discuss the 2030 Roadmap for Greater Washington on a panel moderated by Bob Buchanan, of The 2030 Group

Roadmap Event InviteGreater Washington has been recognized as one of the fittest and greenest cities in America. In 2016, Greater Washington was ranked #1 on the U.S. Census list of Most Educated Metro Areas and Bon Appetit named DC its 2016 Restaurant City of the Year. Nestle recently decided to move its new headquarters here, and US News & World Report ranked Greater Washington #4 on its list of best places to live. These are achievements to celebrate and are proof that this region is more than just the federal city.

Are we ready to come together as a region to champion this new regional identity? Are we taking the necessary steps as a region to project more than our image, but also develop our economy away from its historic dependence on federal spending?

The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Economic Future revealed that we must address our transportation and housing affordability issues, rebrand the region, and increase the collaboration between the academic sector and business community in a way that ignites the entrepreneurial culture across the region if we are to solve our issues locally and compete globally.

As we move through 2017, how are we advancing on each of these fronts? How will the new administration’s policies and practices impact the region? Are we doing enough to attract, retain, and retrain our talented workforce?

To gain a better understanding of where we are as a region and what we need to do to move forward, please join us on March 30, 2017 from 8:30am- 11:30am at the Hay Adams.

RSVP


March 9, 2017
The 2030 Group: Regional Strategies and Solutions

2030 Regional Flyer - Pg 1

The 2030 Group: Regional Strategies and Solutions

The 2030 Group: Regional Strategies and Solutions

 

The 2030 Group: Regional Strategies and Solutions


March 3, 2017
After finally wooing millennials, Washington cannot hold them
washington-post-large-logo-2
Published: March 2, 2017
Millennials have been flocking to Washington for nearly a decade, lured by the promise of plentiful jobs and high wages in the aftermath of the Great Recession.But will they stay? Researchers say it’s doubtful.

“The high cost of living, horrendous traffic and high crime levels may cause millennials to have second thoughts about staying in the D.C. region,” according to a new report by American University’s Kogod School of Business. “Only 9 percent say they will definitely not leave in the next five years.”

Two-thirds of Washington’s 20- and 30-somethings said they would consider moving out of the area for the right job. Arlington residents were most likely to leave town, with 78 percent saying they weren’t particularly wedded to the area.

“A demographic tsunami is upon us,” said Stephen Fuller, an economist and professor of public policy at George Mason University. “There are already signs that millennials are moving out as fast as they’re moving in. They’ve come here to get their tickets punched, to learn the trade, to get some experience — and now that they have that, they’re not so keen on sticking around.”

For now, though, the Washington area continues its reign as the second-most desirable U.S. locale for millennials, behind San Francisco and ahead of Boston, New York and Denver. Researchers surveyed 504 adults on 33 factors, including job availability, salary levels, housing and child-care costs.

“We hear a lot about millennials as though they’re mythological creatures from another planet — a planet with beanbag chairs and foosball tables in every office,” said Dawn Leijon, executive-in-residence at the Kogod School of Business and the report’s lead researcher. “But they have the same working-stiff concerns that previous generations did: Are there enough jobs? Can they make enough money to pay the bills?”

And, she added, they’re increasingly finding it difficult — and expensive — to put down roots in the Washington region. Even with an average salary of $65,910 — a 39 percent premium on the national average of $48,320, only 12 percent of millennials said they felt they could afford to buy a house in the area, according to the second annual Kogod Greater Washington Millennial Index.

“The high cost of living makes it very, very difficult to save money towards retirement,” one survey respondent said. “Many people are living paycheck to paycheck.”

Traffic was another source of frustration. The Washington area has the second-worse commute, behind New York, according to Leijon. It turns out, for all of the talk of public transportation, ride-sharing and cycling, 60 percent of Washington’s millennials drive themselves to work each day. Many — 57 percent of those surveyed — said they could commute using Metro, but chose not to do so because it is unreliable and inefficient.

“Traffic is horrendous,” Leijon said, adding that 32 percent of survey respondents said congested roads were the worst part of living in the area. “About one-third of millennials said their commute is ‘killing’ them.”

The Washington region should work to retain its concentration of 20- and 30-somethings, Leijon said. By 2020, millennials will make up half of the U.S. workforce, making it especially important for the region to be able to attract — and keep — well-
educated workers.

In practice, many millennials said that means having employers who match their contributions to 401(k) plans and subsidize their health insurance. They also said they would like a paid, two-month sabbatical after five years of employment and the option to telecommute at least one day a week.

“Washington has traditionally been all about workaholics,” Fuller said. “But millennials don’t want that — they want work-life balance, and it is essential that companies pay attention.”

American University’s Kogod School of Business Greater Washington Index 2017 Millennials